April 23rd, 2014
Don’t assume, ask. Be kind. Tell the truth. Don’t say anything you can’t stand behind fully. Have integrity. Tell people how you feel.
Warsan Shire 

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April 18th, 2014

Taste by Luciano Barbera

(Source: teenagedirtstache)

Leather Beanbag Range is part of the genuine leather beanbag range, Carambola Collection is shaped as the name suggests. Inspired by the contours of the exotic star fruit with its distinctive ridges.  

Handmade in very comfortable, durable Italian leather which comes in various colours and also for outdoor. 

Our beanbags are unique.  

Each beanbag comes a promise of comfort wherever and whenever it’s used.

Handmade in London and available in 3 sizes Small, Medium & Large each can be made in various colours.

(Source: millecouleurslondon)

Dr. Andre Churchwell, comparing men’s style to jazz. 

(Source: putthison)

LM GUEST HOUSE. Desai /Chia - Architecture. New York. USA. images (c) Paul Warchol

(Source: architags, via newsprezzatura)

A few old acquaintances 

(Source: stockingssexy)

Shoe-making porn short video on making a pair of Louis Vuitton

(Source: dimitmaria)

A short video by Zink & Sons Tailors Sydney

(Source: vimeo.com, via zinkandsons)

Featured Looks at Buckhead Haberdashery

Address: 2770 Lenox Rd Suite B2. Atlanta GA, 30324

(Source: bhaberdashery)

New Yakhair shoebrush

(Source: pictoturo)

In the Kitchen: How to Make Croquembouche

(Source: foodopia, via mycookshelf)

Linen may be our oldest body covering — not counting fig leaves, of course. Even before the Biblical physician Luke told his story of the proper gentleman, “a certain rich man, which was clothed in purple and fine linen, and fared sumptuously every day”, it had been woven into garments in Egypt for centuries. It was apparently understood from the very beginning that linen was not only a durable material for fabric, but was easily washed. “Fresh linen and plenty of country washing,” was Beau Brummell’s dictum and advice to his aristocratic friends who were still wrapped in layers of soiled satin and greasy woollens up through the Regency era. [via The Rake]

Linen may be our oldest body covering — not counting fig leaves, of course. Even before the Biblical physician Luke told his story of the proper gentleman, “a certain rich man, which was clothed in purple and fine linen, and fared sumptuously every day”, it had been woven into garments in Egypt for centuries. It was apparently understood from the very beginning that linen was not only a durable material for fabric, but was easily washed. “Fresh linen and plenty of country washing,” was Beau Brummell’s dictum and advice to his aristocratic friends who were still wrapped in layers of soiled satin and greasy woollens up through the Regency era. [via The Rake]

(via rakehound)

More Than a Soft Shoulder :

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The appeal of soft Italian tailoring has set style trends in men’s clothing for at least a few decades now. Although the technique is commonly attributed to Giorgio Armani (particularly in the business press), it really goes back to the Rubinacci and Caraceni families in Naples and Rome, respectively. They’re the ones who took the “stuffing out of suits” by using thinner and lighter shoulder pads, reducing the weight of the canvassing and haircloth inside, and striping away the lining.

In popular writing, this technique often gets reduced to a simple description about a “soft shoulder,” but when I think of what makes this style appealing to me, it’s about much more than a shoulder line. Instead, I think of style icons such as Gianni Agnelli (who often wore Caraceni) and Vittorio de Sica (who often wore Rubinacci), as well as the many men who represent Neapolitan style today (Rubinacci, Solito, Ciardi, Panico, etc). The styles worn and created by these men isn’t just about their softer shoulder, but rather the overall “roundness” of their silhouettes.

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Clothing should be a wonderful tool that gives you confidence to cope with the slings and arrows of outrageous fortune that you meet in life. It should be fun.
Bruce Boyer in one of my favorite segments of our second season
You always need to put your stamp on a character, but we were clear from the beginning that they had to be sartorially distinctive. Little things like Tommy wears the collar but without the tie, while some of the others wear a tie or a dicky bow. They don’t have that much money, but the money that they do they spend on their clobber. Every actor can really find a character through the costume. ~ Cillian Murphy on his Peaky Blinders costume (X)

You always need to put your stamp on a character, but we were clear from the beginning that they had to be sartorially distinctive. Little things like Tommy wears the collar but without the tie, while some of the others wear a tie or a dicky bow. They don’t have that much money, but the money that they do they spend on their clobber. Every actor can really find a character through the costume. ~ Cillian Murphy on his Peaky Blinders costume (X)

(Source: ohfuckyeahcillianmurphy)