Deciding whether or not to trust a person is like deciding whether or not to climb a tree because you might get a wonderful view from the highest branch or you might simply get covered in sap and for this reason many people choose to spend their time alone and indoors where it is harder to get a splinter.
Lemony Snicket 
The Patrimony is one of the original classic watches, a flagship model of the world’s oldest watch brand, Vacheron Constantin (founded 1755). The Patrimony Traditionnelle Chronograph was one of the original manual wound classics. This forerunner of the Patrimony Chronograph has a 30-minute totalizer at 3 o’clock, and a tachymeter scale. There are also a couple of features, used in conjunction with the chronograph function, that made it a useful watch for medical doctors (or athletic trainers). It has a pulsometer, which can be used to measure pulse rate – graduated for 30 beats, which is written on the dial in French – and an asthmometer, which can be used to measure a patient’s respiration. The case is yellow gold with a grained silver dial, with baton hands - 10/10

The Patrimony is one of the original classic watches, a flagship model of the world’s oldest watch brand, Vacheron Constantin (founded 1755). The Patrimony Traditionnelle Chronograph was one of the original manual wound classics. This forerunner of the Patrimony Chronograph has a 30-minute totalizer at 3 o’clock, and a tachymeter scale. There are also a couple of features, used in conjunction with the chronograph function, that made it a useful watch for medical doctors (or athletic trainers). It has a pulsometer, which can be used to measure pulse rate – graduated for 30 beats, which is written on the dial in French – and an asthmometer, which can be used to measure a patient’s respiration. The case is yellow gold with a grained silver dial, with baton hands - 10/10

Reblogged from gentlementools

Summer is in full swing, a few lighter-weight items this week in The SEAM Store to help you beat the heat.

  1. Insane Tartan Suit
  2. Brooks Brothers Madison Birdseye Suit
  3. Peak Lapel Blue and Brass Blazer
  4. Chester Barrie Nailhead Suit
  5. Vintage Dupioni Silk Jacket
  6. Cantarelli Triple Patch Pocket Silk/Linen Blend Jacket
  7. Vintage Yellow Summer Sport Coat
  8. Yeah it’s Jos A bank, but I like it. Navy Tie
  9. Lot of 10 Silk Pocket Squares
  10. Cotton Madras Tie

Reblogged from one-stitch-in-the-seam

You must learn her.

You must know the reason why she is silent. You must trace her weakest spots. You must write to her. You must remind her that you are there. You must know how long it takes for her to give up. You must be there to hold her when she is about to.

You must love her because many have tried and failed. And she wants to know that she is worthy to be loved, that she is worthy to be kept.

And, this is how you keep her.

Junot Díaz, This Is How You Lose Her 
King Minos’s Labyrinth
"In Greek mythology, the Labyrinth (Greek λαβύρινθος labyrinthos) was an elaborate structure designed and built by the legendary artificer Daedalus for King Minos of Crete at the palace Knossos. 
Its function was to hold Minos’s son, Minotaur, a mythical creature that was half man and half bull. 
Daedalus had so cunningly made the Labyrinth that he could barely escape it after he built it.
Every nine years, Minos made King Aegeus pick seven young boys and seven young girls to be sent to Daedalus's creation, the Labyrinth, to be eaten by the Minotaur. 
After his death, Minos became a judge of the dead in the underworld. The Minoan civilization of Crete has been named after him by the archaeologist Arthur Evans.
In colloquial English, labyrinth is generally synonymous with maze, but many contemporary scholars observe a distinction between the two: maze refers to a complex branching (multicursal) puzzle with choices of path and direction; while a single-path (unicursal) labyrinth has only a single, non-branching path, which leads to the center. A labyrinth in this sense has an unambiguous route to the center and back and is not designed to be difficult to navigate.”

King Minos’s Labyrinth

"In Greek mythology, the Labyrinth (Greek λαβύρινθος labyrinthos) was an elaborate structure designed and built by the legendary artificer Daedalus for King Minos of Crete at the palace Knossos.

Its function was to hold Minos’s son, Minotaur, a mythical creature that was half man and half bull.

Daedalus had so cunningly made the Labyrinth that he could barely escape it after he built it.

Every nine years, Minos made King Aegeus pick seven young boys and seven young girls to be sent to Daedalus's creation, the Labyrinth, to be eaten by the Minotaur.

After his death, Minos became a judge of the dead in the underworld. The Minoan civilization of Crete has been named after him by the archaeologist Arthur Evans.

In colloquial English, labyrinth is generally synonymous with maze, but many contemporary scholars observe a distinction between the two: maze refers to a complex branching (multicursal) puzzle with choices of path and direction; while a single-path (unicursal) labyrinth has only a single, non-branching path, which leads to the center. A labyrinth in this sense has an unambiguous route to the center and back and is not designed to be difficult to navigate.”

Reblogged from booklover